Friday, September 23, 2016

1962 Topps #598: Rookie Parade Outfielders

     With my recent acquisition of the last card in the 1962 Topps baseball card set, I'm now down to only 5 missing cards to complete one of my all-time favorite sets.  The only issue I have with this acquisition is that it arrived slabbed.



     So forgive me for being a slabcracker because all of my personal sets are stored in binder pages without exception--I thought that this card was actually a [VG-EX+ 4.5] anyways, since the centering and surface are nearly perfect.  Below, are a couple of binder pages from the back of my 1962 Topps set binder that depict the Rookie Parade subset.  The 2 missing slots are reserved for #592 and #594.


     So, what I've begun doing with my set binder organization as of late is leaving only the special subset cards that don't fit effectively into one of my team sets and placing them at the end in reverse chronological or significance order.  In this case, I was able to pull out the All-Star and Player Combo cards to insert along with my team sets.  The subsets I have leftover are: World Series (not shown), League Leaders, Rookie Parade, Babe Ruth Special, and Checklists. 

1970 Topps Booklet #22: Bob Gibson, St. Louis Cardinals, P

     Just when I thought that I've completed the 1970's Topps decade collection, I discover a few insert sets that I'd like to include into my collection. The first two were the 1973-1974 Topps Team Checklist insert cards that I finally completed a few weeks ago, and now rest in the front of each of the team sets in my set binders.  Recently, I discovered the 1970-1971 Topps Scratchoffs, Posters, and Booklets.


     Here's my first Booklets double that I've also listed for sale.  It's a copy of Hall of Famer Bob Gibson's story in not-so-great condition, but very interesting never-the-less.  I did manage to complete the 24-card Booklets insert set this week, and currently have them organized numerically in the back of my '70T set binder.  I'm not yet sure if I'll integrate them into my base set, but it is certainly a consideration right now.    





     I think the 1970 Topps set deserves to get a better look from collectors.  The grey backgrounds with the blue and yellow card backs design probably wasn't the most appealing to collectors, but the set is full of great photos of stars either early or late during their careers.  It also has a 3 cool insert sets that are still very affordable.  I find myself looking more often at my 1970 Topps set than many of my other early-'70s sets, including the typically more popular 1971 Topps set.  I guess there is just something special about the 1970 set that is easy to overlook at first glance.    

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

3 Years into my 1951 Topps Set

Three and a half years ago, I posted a blog on my first acquisition from the 1951 Topps set.  With the acquisition of three new cards today, I've somehow managed to put together 86 cards from this 106-card set during that time.


I finally broke down and purchased a box of 12-pocket pages to store my 1948 Bowman to 1951 Topps collection and save space.  As with all of my sets, my 1951 Topps collection is organized by team winning percentage followed by player's age.  In this case, the Yankees beat the Giants for their 3rd consecutive World Series victory after Bobby Thomson hit that famous HR against the Dodgers in a tie-breaker to get into the World Series.  The rest of the team follow by winning percentage.


Sometime over the past three and a half years, I was able to complete the "A" series (Red Backs) consisting of 52 Topps Base cards, and what I like to refer to as the first 2 Topps Traded cards for a total of 54 different "A" series cards.  Since then, I've been focusing on the much more expensive "B" series (Blue Backs), from which I've managed to complete 32 of the 52 cards so far.  


When I first started collecting baseball cards in 1987, I had never even heard of the 1951 Topps set.  The industry seemed to behave as though Topps didn't come out until 1952.  It wasn't until Topps' 40th anniversary set in 1991 when I first started to question when the initial Topps set was released.  I don't even think that price guides were acknowledging this set during my initial collecting years.  I don't actually remember when I first discovered this set, but I'm willing to bet that it didn't occur until after my return from a 10-year hiatus away from the hobby in 2001.  


I think this is a fantastic set deserving of much more respect from the baseball card industry, and hope to have it completed long before Topps' 70th anniversary.